News about Geoffrey’s directing.

Review: Arvada Center’s “Waiting for Godot” packs a wallop

Here an emphasis on vaudevillian antics, including physical shtick reminiscent of the Marx brothers, offsets the difficulty of the philosophical exploration. Particularly in the first act, silliness eclipses the desperation and pointlessness. By the second act, when aching emptiness really kicks in, the darker, more disturbing tones take hold. -Joanne Ostrow, Denver Post

Review: Arvada’s Waiting for Godot Is Funny, Sad, Moving…and a Must-See

…very few share Geoffrey Kent’s mixture of intellectual curiosity and cheerful iconoclasm, his delight in fiddling with minute details while also introducing big bold moves … or his ability to sense the rhythm and poetry of a piece. -Juliet Wittman, WESTWORD

Review: Arvada Center’s ‘Waiting for Godot’ turns relentless angst, ennui, and cruelty into rollicking good fun

…Why did I laugh so hard, nearly all the way through? If it’s not masochism, it must be great theatre. Credit goes to Geoffrey Kent’s superb direction… -Patrick Dorn, patrickdorn.com

Feature: An Act of God has God Taking The Stage

“For 90 minutes I laughed continually. I wasn’t expecting to, but I certainly did.” -CBS4’s Critic at Large Greg Moody.

Review: Heavenly Hilarity in An Act of God

Is the message that we’re better off without our gods? That a god-free universe might be less murderous, vicious and petty? I don’t think there’s a message at all. Just ninety minutes of sheer hilarity… [and] excellent pacing, courtesy of director Geoffrey Kent.

Video: Bard fest hosts reading of ‘translated’ ‘Henry VI’ plays

Doug’s got a pretty light touch, so it still sounds like Shakespeare. We’re not saying, ‘Yo, dude!’ or anything,” Kent says. “I really think the goal is to create scripts that are a little less legwork for the actor and a little more accessible to the modern ear.

Feature: A Day in the Life of Geoffrey Kent

Twenty years after his arrival at the Denver Center, Geoff Kent is as busy as any kid ever was trying to break into the business. In short, he continues to practice pretty much every theatre discipline he ever learned – at the same time.

Review: The Comedy of Errors

Kent’s production of the play… asked an important question about the role of women on stage and forced the audience to answer a question pertinent to our current cultural milieu—can women be funny—with a resounding, “Yes!”

Feature: Colorado Matters on Gender Swapping The Comedy of Errors

Geoffrey Kent directed the play, and Lindsey Kyler stars in it as Dromia of Syracuse. They spoke with Colorado Matters host Ryan Warner.

Review: The Comedy of Errors Doubles Down

Kent’s inventiveness and the answering playfulness of his cast combine to create a joyous, light-as-air celebration, and a good start to the 2016 Colorado Shakespeare Festival season.